top of page

Design Tips for Business Brochures

Tri-Fold Brochure

Sample Tri-Fold Brochure layout
Sample Tri-Fold Brochure layout

The Tri-Fold is the most common. These are easy to produce, and a nice size to place in racks, or hand out at events or display in offices.




The front panel displays the company logo and headline. The inner panels help sell the product/service using supporting facts and details. The final panel contains contact info and a call-to-action.


Catalog Brochure

Catalog Brochure Layout
Catalog Brochure Layout

The Catalog Brochure is a larger most often glossy and packed with information and photographs designed to make your company / organization stand out. These are often coffee table type designs to look like a magazine to engage the reader on a multitude of topics that aren't just directly related to your company but also showcase how your company can solve problems related to the reader in an interesting and engaging design.



The front panel displays the company logo and headline. The inner panels help sell the product/service using supporting facts and details. The final panel contains contact info and a call-to-action.


These types of brochures are wonderful for large catalogs of products or services or can be changed out seasonally to keep the consumer up to date in an engaging way.


Bi-Fold Brochure

Bi-Fold Brochure Layout
Bi-Fold Brochure Layout

This type of brochure can be used to stand out in a unique size against other brochures. It can be used to give the reader more, more whitespace so your messages stand out, or more information so your message gets across clearly, or more pho


tos so you can let your product speak for itself.


The front panel displays the company logo and headline. The inner panels help sell the product/service using supporting facts and details. The final panel contains contact info and a call-to-action.


Rack Card

Rack Card Brochure Layout
Rack Card Brochure Layout

This brochure is typically printed on a cardstock the same size as the folded portion of a trifold brochure. It's two sided and with no interior panels it displays it's information quickly and at a low cost and when photos are added it's bright and crisp design and hefty weight stand up and stand out next to tri-fold brochures.


The upper part of front panel displays the company logo and headline. The lower front panel help sell the product/service using supporting facts and details. The back panel contains contact info and a call-to-action.


Content

Quickly let your audience know what you want to share and remember not to give too much homework for your reader. Less is more. You can communicate your message in a short snappy and engaging way they will remember you.



Typography

Make sure you choose easy to read and something eye catching that matches your brand logo. Don't overdo the fonts one or two that compliment your logo is best.



Images

Professional images are just more professonal. Be sure to have high quality stock images or professional photography done to make sure all of your pictures are worth 1,000 great words.



Highlights

Need to drive a point home? Be sure to use the layout of your content to your advantage and highlight the one thing you want your readers to remember above all else.



Organization

Be sure to professionally line up content and organize it in a way that can be skimmed and the important details can stand out.



Bleeds

Professionals use bleeds to make sure images and backgrounds can go all the way to the edge. We do this by making the brochures larger and trimming off the excess so it looks as if your content goes all the way to the edge. Nothing looks professional if the margins are off, or you have a strange border around it.



16 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page